FDAI logo   ::  Site Map  ::   
Home  |  About This Website  |  Contact Us
Home » ... » Evidence from Resource

Evidence from Resource 3 pieces of evidence from this resource.

Palmer, E.A. & Mitchell, C.M. (1997). Models, methods, and metrics: A structured approach for the evaluation and redesign of autoflight system interfaces. In R.S. Jensen & L. Rakovan (Eds.), Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Aviation Psychology, 965-970. Columbus, OH: The Ohio State University.

  1.  
  2. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Observational Study
    Evidence: "That automation of the tracking task reduced RT to instrument deviations (although the effect was only significant for one of the tasks) is not surprising. The present results show that automation-induced improvements in responses to other tasks, due to task offloading, can be demonstrated in a moderate-fidelity simulated environment, just as they can be found in lower-fidelity part-task settings (e.g., Parasuraman et al., 1991)." (page 782)
    Issue: automation may adversely affect pilot workload (Issue #79) See Issue details
    Strength: -1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation

  3.  
  4. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Observational Study
    Evidence: "For all four of the measures [psychophysiological measures], mental workload was higher in the Manual tracking condition than in Automated tracking. This effect was not significant at the .05 level for the IBI measure [F(1,11)=1.08, p=.32], but did attain significance for HRV [F(1,11)=35.93, p=.0001] and .10HZ [F(1,11)=7.34, p=.02], and approached significance for RSA [F(1,11)=4.18, p=.07]." (page 782)
    Issue: automation may adversely affect pilot workload (Issue #79) See Issue details
    Strength: -1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation

  5.  
  6. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Observational Study
    Evidence: "As hypothesized, response times were generally increased by time-on-task and/or by Manual (as compared to Automated) tracking. However, the pattern of statistical significance differed, depending on which instrument was being responded to. RTs to NAV1 deflections grew slower as a function of time on-task, with decrements occurring as early as the second five-minute period of a session. This task was not, however, significantly slowed by the need to manually maintain heading. Resets of the AI failures, though, were unaffected by time-on-task. Instead, this task was impaired by the Manual tracking condition, which saw participants taking on average almost twice as long to respond to this event as they took during Automated tracking." (page 782)
    Issue: automation may adversely affect pilot workload (Issue #79) See Issue details
    Strength: -1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
Flight Deck Automation Issues Website  
© 1997-2013 Research Integrations, Inc.