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Evidence for an Issue 4 pieces of evidence for this issue.

state prediction may be lacking (Issue #152) - Automation displays may show only current state and no trend or other information that could help pilots estimate future state or behavior. This may prevent pilots from anticipating and preparing for problems.

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  2. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 10 of the 30 (33%) respondents reported a 4 (= agree) or 5 (= strongly agree) with pc32 trend information may be lacking
    Strength: +2
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

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  4. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 13 of the 30 (43%) respondents reported a 1 (=strongly disagree) or a 2 (=disagree) with pc32 trend information may be lacking
    Strength: -2
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

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  6. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: C. ALTITUDE DEVIATIONS ("BUSTS") ... Incidents Reported ... [One pilot in the study reported the following:] Observed a few altitude busts while being hand flown due to distraction with company paperwork and radio calls, ATC radio calls and routing, and A/C abnormalities. This aircraft needs an altitude alerting system that signals the approach of an altitude, not after you bust it. I realize that is contrary to the 'quiet cockpit' philosophy touted by Boeing, but the standard altitude alerting system in other aircraft is distinct enough and recognized by all pilots to be immediately identified and not confus4ed as an EICAS alert message. The one [emphasized] extra cockpit sound is well worth the compromise of that philophy. No extra training or crew coordination would be the cure. 2067" (page 113-116)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: B757
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1989). Human Factors of Advanced Technology ("Glass Cockpit") Transport Aircraft. NASA Contractor Report 177528. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details

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  8. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: Pilots responded to "Open-Ended Question 3. What operational features should be added to improve safety and/or reduce workload?" 3 pilots out of a total of 291, 1% responded "Airspeed Trend/Thrust Vector" (page 170)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wise, J.A., Abbott, D.W., Tilden, D., Dyck, J.L., Guide, P.C., & Ryan, L. (1993). Automation in Corporate Aviation: Human Factors Issues. CAAR-15406-93-1. Daytona Beach, FL: Center for Aviation/Aerospace Research, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. See Resource details
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