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Evidence for an Issue 4 pieces of evidence for this issue.

automation information in manuals may be inadequate (Issue #140) - Manuals provided to pilots may contain incomplete, unclear, or erroneous information about automation, possibly leading to poor pilot performance.

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  2. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 12 of the 30 (40%) respondents reported a 4 (= agree) or 5 (= strongly agree) with pc140 printed media may be inadequate
    Strength: +2
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

  3.  
  4. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 2 of the 30 (7%) respondents reported a 1 (=strongly disagree) or a 2 (=disagree) with pc140 printed media may be inadequate
    Strength: -1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

  5.  
  6. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "4. CAUSES ... The AAIC determined that the following factors, as a chain or a combination thereof, caused the accident: ... 6. The CAP and F/O did not sufficiently understand the FD mode change and the AP override function. It is considered that unclear descriptions of the AFS (Automatic Flight System) in the FCOM prepared by the aircraft manufacturer contributed to this." (page 4.1)
    Strength: +4
    Aircraft: A300B4-622R
    Equipment: autoflight
    Source: Ministry of Transport Japan, Aircraft Accident Investigation Commission (1996). China Airlines Airbus Industrie A300B4-622R, B1816, Nagoya Airport, April 26, 1994. Report 96-5. Ministry of Transport. See Resource details

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  8. Evidence Type: Excerpt from resource
    Evidence: "We also asked pilots whether and how they were able to explain and learn from their experiences. Of the 56 pilots answering this question, 22 (39.3%) never found an explanation for at least one of the reported surprises. In 24 cases (42.9%), the problem was explained by a more experienced crew member, and 11 pilots (19.6%) figured out what had happened on their own. Consultation of the aircraft’s operating manual provided an explanation in 6 cases (10.7%)."
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: A-320
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Sherry, L. & Polson, P.G. (1999). Shared models of flight management system vertical guidance. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 9(2), 139-153. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. See Resource details
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