FDAI logo   ::  Site Map  ::   
Home  |  About This Website  |  Contact Us
Home » ... » Evidence for an Issue

Evidence for an Issue 6 pieces of evidence for this issue.

automation skills may be lost (Issue #137) - Prolonged absence from advanced technology aircraft may result in a loss of automation use skills, possibly resulting in poor pilot performance when pilots return to advanced technology aircraft.

  1.  
  2. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: Moreover, it is essential to be able to develop a good understanding of the characteristics and functions of other collaborators (e.g. what they can do, how they do it; how they are structured; what they cannot do). Whilst the behaviour of the computer-based systems may make perfect sense to the automation logic, it does not necessarily to the pilots: P1: “It’s understanding the technology, and if you are not doing a particular function often enough you forget ... If you can understand it, you would be able to remember it a lot longer. (page 4)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Bruseberg, A., & Johnson, P. (2004). Should Computers Function as Collaborators?. In Proceedings of HCI-Aero 2004 held in Toulouse, France September 29, 2004 to 1 October 2004. See Resource details

  3.  
  4. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 10 of the 30 (33%) respondents reported a 4 (= agree) or 5 (= strongly agree) with pc137 automation skills may be lost
    Strength: +2
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

  5.  
  6. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 3 of the 30 (10%) respondents reported a 1 (=strongly disagree) or a 2 (=disagree) with pc137 automation skills may be lost
    Strength: -1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

  7.  
  8. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "III. Transition Training Issues ... D. 'Differences' Training with 'Common Type' a. Is differences training (where the new aircraft is considered a 'common type' with a previous aircraft) adequate? ... '...In every case pilots report that a prolonged absence form the advanced technology aircraft results in a marked diminution of skill that has significantly greater adverse impact on their piloting proficiency than a similar absence from the cockpit of an older technology aircraft. This loss of proficiency is not necessarily associated with the manipulation of controls. It is directly related to the operation of the flight guidance systems of the aircraft.' (Dodge, 1988)" (page 21-22)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Orlady, H.W. & Wheeler, W.A. (1989). Training for Advanced Cockpit Technology Aircraft. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System. See Resource details

  9.  
  10. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: The following is a comment from a pilot "when asked [in the Orlady study] if skill deterioration was more of a problem with ADVTECH aircraft than with other airplanes they had flown ... '[No] could be a problem but most pilots won't let it happen. I find it easier to forget programming skills than flying skills.'" (page 11)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Orlady, H.W. & Wheeler, W.A. (1989). Training for Advanced Cockpit Technology Aircraft. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System. See Resource details

  11.  
  12. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "The following comments were written on the Wave One questionnaire forms, in response to no particular question. ... I have never used the flight director very much on any airplane, so I can't use it much now. However, I use it 100% for takeoff. I think the autopilot-autothrottle combination works very well. However, I must use it regularly, or I will get rusty with it." (page 42)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: DC9-80
    Equipment: FMS
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1985). Human Factors of Cockpit Automation: A Field Study of Flight Crew Transition. NASA Contactor Report 177333. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details
Flight Deck Automation Issues Website  
© 1997-2013 Research Integrations, Inc.