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Evidence for an Issue 11 pieces of evidence for this issue.

job satisfaction may be reduced (Issue #13) - Automation may reduce challenges that are the source of job satisfaction, which may adversely affect pilot performance.

  1.  
  2. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "The pilots feel positively about the airplane. More than 86% agreed they 'enjoy flying the 767 more than the older aircraft' (#11)." (page 21)
    Strength: -4
    Aircraft: B767
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Curry, R.E. (1985). The Introduction of New Cockpit Technology: A Human Factors Study. NASA Technical Memorandum 86659, 1-68. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details

  3.  
  4. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: From the survey data: "Sometimes I feel more like a ‘button pusher’ then a pilot." On the scale in which 1= Strongly Disagree, 3=Neutral, 5=Strongly Agree, the mean pilot response was 2.67 and the standard deviation was 1.11. (page 21)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: B757 & B767
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Hutchins, E., Holder, B., & Hayward, M. (1999). Pilot Attitudes Toward Automation. Web published at http://hci.ucsd.edu/hutchins/attitudes/index.html. See Resource details

  5.  
  6. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: The following comment was made in response to the questionnaire statement, "Describe a problem you know of or a concern you have about flightdeck automation.": "Feeling like a system monitor vs. a pilot." (A320 Captain)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: A320
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, B., Wilson, J., & Funk, K. (1997). Flightdeck automation issues: Phase 1 survey analysis. Available: http://www.flightdeckautomation.com/ExpertSurvey/e_report.aspx. See Resource details

  7.  
  8. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 5 of the 30 (17%) respondents reported a 4 (= agree) or 5 (= strongly agree) with pc13 job satisfaction may be reduced
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

  9.  
  10. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: 10 of the 30 (33%) respondents reported a 1 (=strongly disagree) or a 2 (=disagree) with pc13 job satisfaction may be reduced
    Strength: -2
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Lyall, E., Niemczyk, M. & Lyall, R. (1996). Evidence for flightdeck automation problems: A survey of experts. See Resource details

  11.  
  12. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "There is no question that pilots like these airplanes. (There was no exception here regardless of either flying experience or type of airline.)" (page 10)
    Strength: -5
    Aircraft: unspecified
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Orlady, H.W. & Wheeler, W.A. (1989). Training for Advanced Cockpit Technology Aircraft. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System. See Resource details

  13.  
  14. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "The following comment was written on the Wave One questionnaire forms, in response to no particular question. ... Flying the -80 [DC9-80] you are really only a computer programmer." (page 42)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: DC9-80
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1985). Human Factors of Cockpit Automation: A Field Study of Flight Crew Transition. NASA Contactor Report 177333. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details

  15.  
  16. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: Statement 31: "Some times I feel more like a 'button pusher' than a pilot." From the histograph of the responses in Phase 1 of the study, only 18% of the pilots agreed or strongly agreed with the statement and in Phase 2 of the study, only 19% of the pilots agreed or strongly agreed with the statement while 65% disagreed or strongly disagreed in Phase 1, and 58% disagreed or strongly disagreed in Phase 2. The neutral responses were 17% in Phase 1 and 23% in Phase 2. (page 165)
    Strength: +1
    Aircraft: B757
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1989). Human Factors of Advanced Technology ("Glass Cockpit") Transport Aircraft. NASA Contractor Report 177528. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details

  17.  
  18. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "In summary, the author encountered nothing in this study to warrant concern for the psychological disenchantment with flying as a profession as a result of the advance of automation ... This study has found no signs of automation-induced psycho-social problems such as negativity toward flying as an occupation, or loss of self-esteem. It would appear that his is simply not a matter worthy of concern, and until early signs of such a problem appear in the future, further research into psycho-socal area soes not appear justified." (page 91, 97)
    Strength: -1
    Aircraft: DC9-80
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1985). Human Factors of Cockpit Automation: A Field Study of Flight Crew Transition. NASA Contactor Report 177333. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details

  19.  
  20. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: Statement 31: "Some times I feel more like a 'button pusher' than a pilot." From the histograph of the responses in Phase 1 of the study, only 18% of the pilots agreed or strongly agreed with the statement and in Phase 2 of the study, only 19% of the pilots agreed or strongly agreed with the statement while 65% disagreed or strongly disagreed in Phase 1, and 58% disagreed or strongly disagreed in Phase 2. The neutral responses were 17% in Phase 1 and 23% in Phase 2. (page 165)
    Strength: -3
    Aircraft: B757
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1989). Human Factors of Advanced Technology ("Glass Cockpit") Transport Aircraft. NASA Contractor Report 177528. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details

  21.  
  22. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Survey
    Evidence: "Many who have written in the field of automation, in aviation and elsewhere, have predicted that as systems became more automatic, the workers in those systems would suffer a sense of detachment and lack of self-worth. These authors forsee the day when workers in these highly automated industries will perceive themselves alienated from the goals of the system, playing a minor or peripheral role, or becoming the servants of the machines, rather than the other way around (Wiener and Curry, 1980). So far we have seen no evidence in this study, or previous field studies that such a thing has taken place in cockpit automation." (page 167)
    Strength: -3
    Aircraft: B757
    Equipment: automation
    Source: Wiener, E.L. (1989). Human Factors of Advanced Technology ("Glass Cockpit") Transport Aircraft. NASA Contractor Report 177528. Moffett Field, CA: NASA Ames Research Center. See Resource details
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